Is Collecting Rain Water Illegal in Florida?

illegal-rain-water-collectionEarlier this week we posted an article on collecting rain water. Much to our surprise, we got emails from Florida residents asking if it is illegal to collect rain water in our state.

We thought the question was a little crazy at first, just because it had never dawned on us that it might ever be illegal to collect rain water. However, after doing some research we did discover that there are some laws that make it illegal to collect rain water in some states.

For example, one Oregon resident was sentenced to 30 days in jail and paid a $1,500 fine after collecting rain water on his land. You can read the full story here.

There are several states where rain collection is restricted or illegal. It’s totally illegal, for example, in Oregon and Utah.

Some states require a permit before you can collect rain water. Laws are also changing in some states, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a thorny legal issue for some homeowners.

Some states swing in the opposite direction. In some states, certain types of new builds have to have rainwater collection systems, and some states even offer tax incentives to homeowners who adopt them.

Learning these things prompted us to double check Florida’s laws. Fortunately for Florida homeowners who want to collect rain water, we could not find any laws or statutes on the books.

However, every county is different, and the law does have nuances. For example, some counties have restrictions on how you may use the rain water or how you need to treat it.

The place to start is your county health department. To help our readers we’ve gathered up links for the health departments in each of the counties that we serve.

In addition to following health department requirements we do urge you to be safe when you are using your rainwater catchment system. Rainwater should usually be used as grey water for plants, not as potable drinking water.

Finally, remember that we’re not lawyers – we’re gutter contractors! Laws also do change so to be on the safe side if you’re going to collect rain water, check with your city and county officials first!


  1. Dave says:

    I’ve spent the past year researching the “legality” of rain water harvesting. So far I have personally checked 35 state government websites and the rules thereof. There are 0, that is no states in the US where it is “against the law” to collect rain water as a general state law. I have seen Utah, Oregon, Washington, and Colorado change their laws in favor of rain water harvesting. There may very well be local ordinances that prohibit rain barrels, but that is the exception, not the rule. Colorado is the last holdout of archaic laws regarding rain and water rights. Those laws are not based on modern science. My blog has links to every state government I have checked and also links to others research of the info on the 15 states I have yet to check. There are lots of regulations regarding water in every state, Also if a person wants to set up their own private lake, of course there will be issues and laws. But that is yet another issue.

    • khym says:

      It’s not the legality of actually catching and holding the water..the regulations pertain to the use of such…
      Oregon regulates water use using “water right permits” the farmers have fighting this for years on how much and gets first rights to use water from creeks and rivers to irrigate.
      The State wants to mandate it instalation of water meters farms and charge us for its “Use”
      The man that got in trouble did not have state permits and the city downstream had “Rights” to the water from all rivers, creeks and tributaries feeding the city..
      This man tried for years to get “rights” and was denied his lands and ponds predated these regulations..but he still lost to the state.
      it is not illegal to catch the water it is illegal to use it without a permit because Oregon claimed all water and it’s uses in this State.

  2. Todd Dudkewic says:

    Thanks for the excellent and relevant link!

  3. john moll says:

    In Tampa fl there is a service charge for rain that falls on the roof of a home, collected or not.
    In my case it is $136.12 a year, collected by the Tax Collector. If not paid can result in a lien on the title to the property.

    There is pending a vote for another rain on roof assessment that will amount to $162.75 per year. If passed by City council on October 1, 2015 it will appear on the November Tax bill in 2016.

    I have installed retention ponds. infiltration trenches, rain gardens, vegetated driveways, mulched parking area and rain barrels to manage and keep roof rainwater on the property but the charge remains the same as if no rain water is captured and used on site.

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